The Adoption Option (Part 2) – Adoption Types

The Adoption Option (Part 2) – Adoption Types

In the first blog, we talked about the different ways you can begin an adoption plan. In this part, we will distinguish those choices further.

 

Different types of adoption are distinguished by the level of contact between the birth parents, adoptive parents, and the child. As a birth parent, you have considerable control over what adoption type you choose. You’ll choose a type of adoption based on what level of contact you want, what your state allows, and what agency or facilitator you select.

 

Open adoption.  An open adoption allows for some level of direct contact between birth parents, adoptive parents, and the child. Typically, the birth mom writes an adoption plan for her child which includes choosing the adoptive parents and exchanging letters, pictures, and perhaps visits with her child. The adoptive parents can choose whether or not to accept her plan or negotiate parts of it. Birth parents and adoptive parents can have direct contact before and after the adoption. An open adoption can be handled through an agency or through an independent attorney, depending on state law.

 

Key outcomes
• greater control over the adoption process
• potential for a role in child’s life
• comfort in knowing about child’s well-being

 

Semi-open adoption (or “mediated adoption”). A mediated adoption is a variation of open adoption. Prior to placement, the birth parents and pre-adoptive parents exchange mostly non-identifying information. Once the child is placed in the adoptive home, the adopted child may have contact with the birth family that involves pictures, letters, or other types of communications sent through the adoption agency or the attorney who assisted with the placement.
Key outcomes
• some privacy for all parties
• the ability for all parties to have contact
• comfort in knowing about child’s well-being

 

Closed adoption (“confidential adoption,” “traditional adoption”). A closed adoption allows for no direct contact between birth parents, adoptive parents, and the child. The birth mom (or birth parents) may be given some non-identifying information about the adoptive parents, such as their ages and occupations. Adoptive parents are given information that will help them take care of the child, such as medical or family history. Specific information, including names and addresses, are not revealed to either party. A closed adoption is not as widely used today as it used to be in years past. It can be handled through an agency or through an independent attorney, depending on state law.
Key outcomes
• privacy for all parties
• possible sense of isolation for child, birth parent


Things to think about when considering adoption
• Am I able to give the child the love he needs and deserves? 
• Am I patient enough to deal with the noise, confusion, and the 24-hour-a-day responsibility of having a child? 
• How will I support myself and my child?
• Could I handle a child and a job and/or school while parenting? 
• How would I take care of my child’s health and safety?
• How do I feel about my child being raised in a one-parent household?
• Am I willing to learn about the various types of adoption?
• Do I know any birth moms who have placed? Adoptive families? Adoptees?

 

Overwhelmed with your choices? That’s totally understandable. We are confident we can help you sort through your different options so YOU make the best decision for YOU. Our team of ladies is waiting for your call so we can partner with you in making the best decision.